Tag Archives: 80s

Heavy Metal and Horror link – Robert Englund quote

Heavy Metal and Horror link Robert Englund quote
Robert Englund Freddy Krueger
Robert Englund (Freddy Krueger)

Freddy Krueger x Dokken is just too great to be ignored. 

The connection was so strong that Robert Englund & Dokken even did COCAINE Off Freddy Krueger’s Glove.

Freddy Krueger x Dokken
Freddy Krueger x Dokken
Dokken - A Nightmare on Elm Street 3 Dream Warriors
Dokken – A Nightmare on Elm Street 3: Dream Warriors


Dokken – Dream Warriors (Official Music Video)

from the album ‘Back for the Attack’ (1987)

Dokken – Back for the Attack (1987)

 

Freddy Krueger and thrash metal band S.O.D.
Freddy Krueger and thrash metal band S.O.D.

 


How Freddy Krueger Went From Child Killer to MTV Rock Star

For Halloween, Consequence of Sound dives into the evolution of Freddy Krueger from movie screen’s most gruesome child killer to the 1980’s biggest rockstar. From MTV spots to an NES game, Wes Craven’s character was bigger than Jesus, and remains a pop culture phenomena to this day.

Freddy Krueger horror icon

Quaalude-Rorer (Lemmon) 714 T-Shirt as worn by Slash

Quaalude - Rorer (Lemmon) 714 T-Shirt as worn by Slash

Quaalude – Rorer (Lemmon) 714 T-Shirt as worn by Slash of Guns N’ Roses

Get-Yours-Now-Button.png

 

Quaalude-Rorer (Lemmon) 714 was heavily consumed by real-life Jordan Belford (played by Leonardo DiCaprio) in The Wolf of Wall Street.

QUAALUDE - Jordan Belford (Leonardo DiCaprio) in The Wolf of Wall Street

QUAALUDE – Jordan Belford (Leonardo DiCaprio) in The Wolf of Wall Street

Quaalude The cerebral palsy phase as seen in The Wolf Of Wall Street

Quaalude-Rorer (Lemmon) 714 was heavily consumed by real-life Jordan Belford (played by Leonardo DiCaprio) in The Wolf of Wall Street (2014).

On the below scene, he was so drugged out of his mind that he called it “The cerebral palsy phase!”

 

 

The Rise and Fall of Jordan Belfort: Exploring the Infamous Quaalude Scenes in “The Wolf of Wall Street”

In Martin Scorsese’s electrifying masterpiece “The Wolf of Wall Street,” Leonardo DiCaprio delivers a mesmerizing performance as the notorious stockbroker Jordan Belfort. The film chronicles Belfort’s meteoric rise to wealth and power on Wall Street, as well as his subsequent downfall due to his reckless behavior and addiction to drugs, notably Quaaludes. The portrayal of Belfort’s drug-fueled escapades, particularly his use of Quaaludes, has captivated audiences and sparked discussions about its depiction in cinema.

Quaaludes, formally known as methaqualone, gained popularity in the 1970s as a sedative and hypnotic medication. However, due to its highly addictive nature and potential for abuse, it was eventually classified as a Schedule I controlled substance in the United States. Despite being banned, Quaaludes continued to linger in the underground drug scene, becoming synonymous with excess and debauchery.

In “The Wolf of Wall Street,” Quaaludes serve as both a plot device and a metaphor for Belfort’s descent into moral depravity. The scenes depicting Belfort and his associates indulging in Quaaludes are both comical and disturbing, showcasing the extremes of their hedonistic lifestyle. One memorable sequence involves Belfort struggling to operate his body after consuming a large dose of Quaaludes, resulting in hilariously exaggerated physical comedy.

However, beneath the surface, these scenes also serve to highlight the destructive consequences of addiction. Belfort’s reliance on Quaaludes reflects his insatiable appetite for pleasure and his disregard for the law and ethical boundaries. As he spirals further out of control, his drug use becomes emblematic of the moral decay that permeates his world.

 

QUAALUDE scene - Jordan Belford (Leonardo DiCaprio) in The Wolf of Wall Street

Leonardo DiCaprio’s portrayal of Belfort’s drug-induced antics is nothing short of extraordinary. His ability to convey the character’s manic energy and vulnerability makes for a compelling and unforgettable performance. Through his nuanced acting, DiCaprio humanizes Belfort, allowing audiences to glimpse the complex psychology behind his self-destructive behavior.

While “The Wolf of Wall Street” has been criticized for glamorizing Belfort’s actions, it also serves as a cautionary tale about the perils of unchecked ambition and moral bankruptcy. By depicting the consequences of Belfort’s drug use in such vivid detail, the film forces viewers to confront the darker aspects of his character and the society that enabled his rise to power.

In conclusion, the portrayal of Jordan Belfort’s usage of Quaaludes in “The Wolf of Wall Street” is both mesmerizing and unsettling. It offers a glimpse into the excesses of Wall Street culture while also serving as a stark reminder of the destructive power of addiction. Through Leonardo DiCaprio’s mesmerizing performance, the film leaves a lasting impression that transcends the screen, inviting audiences to ponder the true cost of chasing after wealth and power at any cost.

 

QUAALUDE - Jordan Belford (Leonardo DiCaprio) in The Wolf of Wall Street

Quaalude-Rorer Lemmon 714 T-Shirt The Wolf Of Wall Street
Quaalude-Rorer Lemmon 714 T-Shirt The Wolf Of Wall Street

 

Quaalude-300 (methaqualone)
A family-friendly pill. Isn’t it?

OZZY OIL – The Ultimate Sin

OZZY OIL The Ultimate Sin

Ozzy Oil as seen in Ozzy Osbourne – The Ultimate Sin music video. Where Ozzy Osbourne played his version of JR Ewing and Ewing Oil from the most famous TV series of the 80s, Dallas. Two of my favorites in one, Ozzy/JR.

Larry Hagman as the villainous oilman J.R. Ewing
Larry Hagman as the villain oilman J.R. Ewing (Dallas)

OZZY OIL The Ultimate Sin 1986

The Breakfast Club

The Breakfast Club

They only met once, but it changed their lives forever.

They were five total strangers, with nothing in common, meeting for the first time. A brain, a beauty, a jock, a rebel and a recluse. Before the day was over, they broke the rules. Bared their souls and touched each other in a way they never dreamed possible.

Five strangers with nothing in common, except each other.

Dear Mr. Vernon, we accept the fact that we had to sacrifice a whole Saturday in detention for whatever it was we did wrong, but we think you’re crazy to make us write an essay telling you who we think we are. You see us as you want to see us… In the simplest terms and the most convenient definitions. But what we found out is that each one of us is a brain… …and an athlete… …and a basket case… …a princess… and a criminal. Does that answer your question? Sincerely yours, the Breakfast Club.

 

The Breakfast Club -Saturday, March 24, 1984
Already 40 years ago. Seems like yesterday.